Winter Nationals 2015

Badger Swim Club headed to Federal Way, WA this past weekend to compete at AT&T LCM Winter Nationals.  The team of Eric Culver, Ryan Feeley, Anina Lund, Emily  McClellan, Derek Toomey, Lindsay Vrooman, and James Wells placed 6th in combined team scoring.

results

There were several Badgers that contributed to the 6th place honors. Ryan Feeley’s trials swim of 3:51.80 was good enough for third going into finals where he placed 8th. Ryan also placed 12th in the 1500. Emily McClellan also scored for Badger. She placed 11th in the 100 breaststroke with a time of 1:09.65. Lindsay Vrooman had a strong performance as well. She placed 9th in the 200 freestyle with a time of 1:59.45 and 5th in the 400 freestyle with a time of 4:09.00, and she placed 2nd in the 800 freestyle with a time of 8:27.70. James Wells also scored for the team, placing 11th in the 200 backstroke 2:02.81 and 24th in the 100 backstroke 56.84.

One of our newest Badgers, Carly Cummings, swam the 200IM, 400IM, 100 breaststroke, and the 200 Fly. Her 4:53.77 was good enough to make it back to finals where she went 4:49.63 and placed 17th.

Eric Culver placed 29th in the 200 Fly with a time of 2:04.49. Anina Lund swam the 200, 400, and 800. She placed 25th in the 800 with a time of 8:59.63. Derek Toomey placed 34th in the 50 freestyle with a time of 23.22.

The team was without Cody Miller and Zane Grothe who are competing at the Duel in the Pool in Indianapolis this weekend. The team was also missing Spencer Lafata who will be competing at Junior National Championships next week as well. Spencer will be joined by Ian Bidwell and Nathalie Eid.

 

Badger Medals in Montreal

In keeping up with the fast swimming taking place in Federal Way WA by our National Qualifiers, the swimmers who attended the Montreal meet returned home with a total of 128 Medals.

The meet held at the Olympic Park the home of the 1976 Olympics was attended by 21 clubs and 709 swimmers.

Badger Swimmers,  were all making numerous appearances at finals each night with the swimmers all looking to medal  each night.

The energy of the team was extremely high fueled by fast swimming.

We look forward to this meet next season and continued success in the upcoming meets.

 

 

 

 

Badger Swim Club INC.
Gold 42. Men, 50m Freestyle 15 years and older HUBER, Christian P 15 24.16
108. Boys, 50m Freestyle 8 years and younger LOVELESS, Ryan 8 41.63
122. Boys, 100m Freestyle 8 years and younger LOVELESS, Ryan 8 01:37.4
46. Men, 50m Backstroke 13 – 14 years SEIBOLD, Finn J 14 29.41
6. Men, 100m Backstroke 13 – 14 years RAMJOHN, Jalen K 14 01:03.1
30. Men, 200m Backstroke 13 – 14 years RAMJOHN, Jalen K 14 02:16.7
28. Men, 50m Breaststroke 13 – 14 years LOVELESS, Liam J 13 31.38
28. Men, 50m Breaststroke 11 – 12 years SPERES, Nicholas C 11 37.21
44. Men, 100m Breaststroke 13 – 14 years LOVELESS, Liam J 13 01:11.8
118. Boys, 100m Breaststroke 9 years LEE, Cooper C 9 01:58.9
10. Men, 200m Breaststroke 13 – 14 years LOVELESS, Liam J 13 02:34.5
10. Men, 200m Breaststroke 11 – 12 years HARDART, Max 12 02:59.2
120. Boys, 50m Butterfly 8 years and younger LOVELESS, Ryan 8 51.75
24. Men, 100m Butterfly 13 – 14 years RAMJOHN, Jalen K 14 01:01.7
4. Men, 400m Medley 13 – 14 years RAMJOHN, Jalen K 14 05:00.2
36. Men, 4 x 100m Freestyle 13 – 14 years Badger Swim Club INC. 2 04:13.8
20. Men, 4 x 50m Medley 13 – 14 years Badger Swim Club INC. 2 02:04.4
20. Men, 4 x 50m Medley 11 – 12 years Badger Swim Club INC. 1 01:51.2
18. Men, 4 x 100m Medley 13 – 14 years Badger Swim Club INC. 2 12 04:49.8
41. Women, 50m Freestyle 11 – 12 years ARNOLD, Lauren R 29.59
107. Girls, 50m Freestyle 8 years and younger KLEIN, Neala J 8 36.98
11. Women, 100m Freestyle 11 – 12 years PABBY, Anya 12 01:02.9
121. Girls, 100m Freestyle 8 years and younger KLEIN, Neala J 8 01:22.3
21. Women, 200m Freestyle 15 years and older LANTIN, Alexa 16 02:09.1
21. Women, 200m Freestyle 13 – 14 years SHERIDAN, Kerry 14 02:13.4
21. Women, 200m Freestyle 11 – 12 years PENNINGTON, Caroline 12 02:17.3
101. Girls, 200m Freestyle 8 years and younger KLEIN, Neala J 8 02:56.3
13. Women, 800m Freestyle 15 years and older LANTIN, Alexa 16 09:22.0
13. Women, 800m Freestyle 13 – 14 years SHERIDAN, Kerry 14 09:50.0
13. Women, 800m Freestyle 11 – 12 years PENNINGTON, Caroline 12 09:53.8
31. Women, 1500m Freestyle 13 – 14 years SHERIDAN, Kerry 14 18:34.1
31. Women, 1500m Freestyle 11 – 12 years PENNINGTON, Caroline 12 18:44.7
45. Women, 50m Backstroke 11 – 12 years ARNOLD, Lauren R 12 34.3
115. Girls, 50m Backstroke 10 years LEE, Kaitlyn H 10 39.71
115. Girls, 50m Backstroke 8 years and younger KLEIN, Neala J 8 46.42
5. Women, 100m Backstroke 11 – 12 years PABBY, Anya 12 01:09.1
105. Girls, 100m Backstroke 8 years and younger KLEIN, Neala J 8 01:38.7
29. Women, 200m Backstroke 11 – 12 years PABBY, Anya 12 02:27.9
27. Women, 50m Breaststroke 11 – 12 years OTT, Elke J 12 38.43
103. Girls, 50m Breaststroke 10 years LEE, Kaitlyn H 10 41.79
103. Girls, 50m Breaststroke 8 years and younger BARR, Fiona P 8 52.96
43. Women, 100m Breaststroke 11 – 12 years OTT, Elke J 12 01:23.3
117. Girls, 100m Breaststroke 10 years LEE, Kaitlyn H 10 01:32.2
117. Girls, 100m Breaststroke 8 years and younger BARR, Fiona P 8 01:52.9
9. Women, 200m Breaststroke 11 – 12 years OTT, Elke J 12 03:00.9
7. Women, 50m Butterfly 11 – 12 years PABBY, Anya 12 31.62
119. Girls, 50m Butterfly 8 years and younger KLEIN, Neala J 8 42.62
23. Women, 100m Butterfly 11 – 12 years PABBY, Anya 12 01:08.4
25. Women, 100m Medley 11 – 12 years PABBY, Anya 12 01:12.5
109. Girls, 100m Medley 8 years and younger KLEIN, Neala J 8 01:40.0
47. Women, 200m Medley 11 – 12 years PENNINGTON, Caroline 12 02:39.1
113. Girls, 200m Medley 10 years LEE, Kaitlyn H 10 03:00.6
113. Girls, 200m Medley 8 years and younger KLEIN, Neala J 8 03:32.7
Silver 1. Women, 4 x 50m Freestyle 11 – 12 years Badger Swim Club INC. 3 01:58.7
35. Women, 4 x 100m Freestyle 11 – 12 years Badger Swim Club INC. 2 04:27.8
19. Women, 4 x 50m Medley 11 – 12 years Badger Swim Club INC. 2 02:17.6
17. Women, 4 x 100m Medley 11 – 12 years Badger Swim Club INC. 3 05:04.1
42. Men, 50m Freestyle 13 – 14 years SEIBOLD, Finn J 14 26.6
12. Men, 100m Freestyle 13 – 14 years RAMJOHN, Jalen K 14 57.66
22. Men, 200m Freestyle 13 – 14 years RAMJOHN, Jalen K 14 02:02.0
14. Men, 800m Freestyle 15 years and older LOVELESS, John J 15 08:37.1
14. Men, 800m Freestyle 11 – 12 years HARDART, Max 12 10:51.8
32. Men, 1500m Freestyle 15 years and older LOVELESS, John J 15 16:26.1
46. Men, 50m Backstroke 15 years and older TOWNE, Garrett B 15 27.51
116. Boys, 50m Backstroke 8 years and younger LOVELESS, Ryan 8 51.26
6. Men, 100m Backstroke 15 years and older TOWNE, Garrett B 15 01:00.4
6. Men, 100m Backstroke 11 – 12 years HARDART, Max 12 01:18.0
28. Men, 50m Breaststroke 11 – 12 years HARDART, Max 12 38.74
44. Men, 100m Breaststroke 11 – 12 years HARDART, Max 12 01:22.2
120. Boys, 50m Butterfly 9 years LEE, Cooper C 9 51.67
40. Men, 200m Butterfly 15 years and older LOVELESS, John J 15 02:10.4
26. Men, 100m Medley 13 – 14 years LOVELESS, Liam J 13 01:04.6
110. Boys, 100m Medley 9 years LEE, Cooper C 9 01:56.1
110. Boys, 100m Medley 8 years and younger LOVELESS, Ryan 8 01:47.5
4. Men, 400m Medley 15 years and older LOVELESS, John J 15 04:42.0
4. Men, 400m Medley 13 – 14 years LOVELESS, Liam J 13 05:01.5
36. Men, 4 x 100m Freestyle 15 years and older Badger Swim Club INC. 1 03:43.8
18. Men, 4 x 100m Medley 15 years and older Badger Swim Club INC. 1 04:00.1
107. Girls, 50m Freestyle 8 years and younger BARR, Fiona P 8 38.96
11. Women, 100m Freestyle 11 – 12 years ARNOLD, Lauren R 12 01:04.0
121. Girls, 100m Freestyle 8 years and younger BARR, Fiona P 8 01:24.4
21. Women, 200m Freestyle 11 – 12 years OTT, Elke J 12 02:17.5
101. Girls, 200m Freestyle 10 years ANDERSON, Kate E 10 02:46.1
115. Girls, 50m Backstroke 8 years and younger BARR, Fiona P 8 47.36
5. Women, 100m Backstroke 11 – 12 years PENNINGTON, Caroline 12 01:13.7
105. Girls, 100m Backstroke 10 years LEE, Kaitlyn H 10 01:24.6
105. Girls, 100m Backstroke 8 years and younger BARR, Fiona P 8 01:41.8
29. Women, 200m Backstroke 11 – 12 years PENNINGTON, Caroline 12 02:37.1
9. Women, 200m Breaststroke 13 – 14 years VICTORY, Margaret M 14 02:57.1
23. Women, 100m Butterfly 11 – 12 years OTT, Elke J 12 01:11.7
25. Women, 100m Medley 15 years and older NEUBAUER, Marie 15 01:08.3
25. Women, 100m Medley 11 – 12 years ARNOLD, Lauren R 12 01:14.6
109. Girls, 100m Medley 8 years and younger BARR, Fiona P 8 01:40.5
3. Women, 400m Medley 15 years and older NEUBAUER, Marie 15 05:04.3
35. Women, 4 x 100m Freestyle 15 years and older Badger Swim Club INC. 1 04:09.7
123. All, 4 x 50m Medley 12 years and younger Badger Swim Club INC. 1 02:46.1
111. All, 4 x 50m Freestyle 12 years and younger Badger Swim Club INC. 1 02:27.0
Bronze 108. Boys, 50m Freestyle 10 years BREEDEN, Cayden J 10 34
122. Boys, 100m Freestyle 9 years LEE, Cooper C 9 01:37.0
22. Men, 200m Freestyle 11 – 12 years HARDART, Max 12 02:26.5
102. Boys, 200m Freestyle 9 years LEE, Cooper C 9 03:26.5
6. Men, 100m Backstroke 13 – 14 years SEIBOLD, Finn J 14 01:07.3
6. Men, 100m Backstroke 11 – 12 years KLEIN, Evan M 11 01:19.5
30. Men, 200m Backstroke 15 years and older TOWNE, Garrett B 15 02:10.8
30. Men, 200m Backstroke 13 – 14 years SEIBOLD, Finn J 14 02:27.3
104. Boys, 50m Breaststroke 9 years LEE, Cooper C 9 56.96
8. Men, 50m Butterfly 11 – 12 years KLEIN, Evan M 11 34.68
120. Boys, 50m Butterfly 9 years KORVYAKOV, Michael 9 54.19
24. Men, 100m Butterfly 11 – 12 years KLEIN, Evan M 11 01:16.9
40. Men, 200m Butterfly 15 years and older TOWNE, Garrett B 15 02:13.6
110. Boys, 100m Medley 9 years KORVYAKOV, Michael 9 02:01.2
48. Men, 200m Medley 13 – 14 years LOVELESS, Liam J Badger Swim Club INC. 1 13 02:24.5
2. Men, 4 x 50m Freestyle 15 years and older Badger Swim Club INC. 2 01:41.9
2. Men, 4 x 50m Freestyle 13 – 14 years OTT, Elke J 12 01:56.0
41. Women, 50m Freestyle 11 – 12 years OTT, Elke J 12 30.67
11. Women, 100m Freestyle 11 – 12 years OTT, Elke J 12 01:05.7
45. Women, 50m Backstroke 11 – 12 years PENNINGTON, Caroline 12 34.67
115. Girls, 50m Backstroke 9 years HARDART, Annabel M 9 47.52
105. Girls, 100m Backstroke 9 years HARDART, Annabel M 9 01:41.8
43. Women, 100m Breaststroke 13 – 14 years VICTORY, Margaret M 14 01:23.8
117. Girls, 100m Breaststroke 9 years HARDART, Annabel M 9 01:51.1
9. Women, 200m Breaststroke 15 years and older LANTIN, Alexa 16 02:42.1
119. Girls, 50m Butterfly 8 years and younger BARR, Fiona P 8 48.35
23. Women, 100m Butterfly 11 – 12 years ARNOLD, Lauren R 12 01:12.6
109. Girls, 100m Medley 9 years HARDART, Annabel M 9 01:42.3
47. Women, 200m Medley 11 – 12 years ARNOLD, Lauren R 12 02:41.9
1. Women, 4 x 50m Freestyle 13 – 14 years Badger Swim Club INC. 4 02:07.2

Badger Crossing The Border

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This weekend 50 Swimmers from the Junior and Senior Teams of Badger will be traveling to Montreal to participate in the Invitation Provinciale hosted by Neptune Natation at the Olympic Park Sports Centre.

 

 

11540911_376026372608691_6729850693918160176_nThe team will be competing internationally, a first for many of our swimmers attending the meet in Montreal which traditionally is a Badger stop.  Expectations are high for a strong team showing by all competing this weekend, follow our swimmers  at www.neptunenatation.com

The Car Ride Home

A note from Badger Parent Advocate, Mike Conaton:

I recently attended a presentation by Dr. Alex Diaz, a local sports psychology consultant. Dr. Diaz began by explaining the biological development of the human brain which establishes certain innate tendencies. For example, the section of the brain that controls our motor skills, adrenaline and “fight or flight” instincts actually develops before the cognitive section of our brain which enables our ability to think. This was an “A-Ha” moment for me as I could now better understand the origin of the basic concept of “not overthinking things” and just letting your body perform.

We all know many athletes rely on repetition and muscle memory to help achieve optimal performance (think endless practice of attempting free throws, fielding ground balls, swimming stroke technique).  Derek Jeter has said he used to try not to think about it, “let the moment come to him”, then rely on his instincts and reaction to take over. NFL quarterbacks can “see” the entire field and check off the various passing routes. We hear of their ability to seemingly “slow the play down” enabling then their athletic talent to execute. Emotion is kept out of the equation. The better players don’t seem to over think or overreact. As Yogi Berra used to ask, “How can you think and hit at the same time?” We can see what happens when this notion is tested – when football coaches try to “ice the kicker” by calling timeouts before a big field goal attempt to make the kicker have to think too much about the magnitude of the moment.

Dr. Diaz spoke to us the same night that Serena Williams was defeated in the semifinals of the US Open by Roberta Vinci. The number one seated and heavily favored Williams had a chance to win the elusive Calendar Grand Slam but was defeated by Vinci in what some called the greatest upset in women’s tennis history. Dr. Diaz described the progression of Williams’ body language and growing emotion that manifested itself in more and more unforced errors as the match went on. She began to talk to herself after points as the pressure of the moment mounted and the magnitude of the Grand Slam prospects seemed to be too much. Dr. Diaz concluded that Williams clearly beat herself, allowing emotion and self-doubt to outweigh and overtake far superior innate athletic abilities.

Dr. Diaz also offered up some great advice for parents of athletes, some of which is included in an article he has written on the subject which can be viewed here.

Earlier in the kids’ athletic careers, it is important to have fun with the sport. To enjoy it as a physical outlet with a social component. Yes it’s not always about winning. When the focus of the activity begins to be based on performance, things can become more complicated…and parents run the risk of exerting too much influence. Imposing their own dreams and experiences on the kids instead of allowing the kid to have their own – making their own mistakes, learning their own lessons, and taking responsibility for themselves and their performance. Dr. Diaz also cautions parents to act as parents, providing support and unconditional love NOT based on this performance.

Above all, parents should acknowledge that they are not the coach.  This confuses the kids and potentially causes distraction and poor performance. Dr. Diaz noted the squash players he works with who look back at their parents after every shot.   It is dis-functional.   He said this is one reason why parents are often asked not to attend practices so that the kids are not distracted or made unnecessarily self-conscious. Let the kids develop their own relationships with their own coaches.

Finally Dr. Diaz spoke about the dreaded “car ride home”. He said studies show that the car ride home from a game/meet or practice is the number one time of stress and anxiety for an athlete with their parents. Just as you or I would not like to talk about our bad day at the dinner table, so too would our kids rather not rehash and relive the errant play or bad swim – especially with their parents who are not their coaches and are supposed to be the kids’ biggest fans and advocates no matter how they performed.

The recurring theme: UNCONDITIONAL love and support…
 

Michael Conaton, Badger Swim Club Inc. and Badger Swimming Inc. accept no liability for the content of this article, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.

Zane Grothe and Cody Miller – DUEL IN THE POOL

Congratulations to Zane Grothe and Cody Miller on being named to the 2015 Duel in the Pool roster representing the United States on December 11th and 12th at the IUPUI Natatorium in Indianapolis as they take on the European All Stars in short course meters.

The full story can be found at SWIM SWAM .

Badger Ball Golf Outing Foursome Winners

Badger Ball Golf Outing Foursome Winners

Winners of the “Badger Foursome at Winged Foot” from the Badger Ball.

Chris Poleway, William Raffo, Todd Growich and Chris Powers, out enjoying a day of golf with good friends.

Environmental Influence – Harmony

A note from Badger Parent Advocate, Mike Conaton:

I’m reading a great book, Out of Habit, about Sister Rose Ann Fleming who is the Academic Advisor and Guidance Counselor for the Xavier University men’s basketball program.  Xavier takes academics and graduation very seriously and for the last 30 years Sister Rose Ann has been working with some of Xavier’s athletes who are a bit out of practice when it comes to the classroom.  Sister Rose Ann, the former President of Trinity College with three masters, a PhD and a law degree, would actually say she met her greatest career challenges while unlocking the potential of these student athletes. 

My favorite lesson in the book so far is a simple one – kids perform better if they think the teacher “likes them” in a “comfortable” environment.  Sister Rose Ann tells the story of the basketball player who was skipping classes and struggling with the work.  After much probing, it turns out the big seven-footer was actually quite sensitive and thought that the teacher didn’t like him, ignored him and favored other non-basketball athletes in the class.  Somehow the high profile player felt he was taken for granted.  The teacher never asked him how he did or commented on his frequent TV appearances.   The only reference to his basketball was to ask him if he had done his homework during his absences while traveling. He was uncomfortable and insecure, and while his hurt feelings were probably irrational and immature, guess what, kids are often irrational and immature.  Sister Rose Ann points out that “students learn better when they know you like them.  If young people don’t think you like them, if you don’t respect the abilities they have, they will shut you out.  They care”.  It can be as simple as a smile or an acknowledging “hello”.  

Certainly there is a message here for teachers and coaches, but how does this translate for a parent of a swimmer?   Not only do we “like” our kids, of course we love them. But I think an extrapolated point of the story is the notion of creating an environment in which the kids can feel comfortable and thrive.  

Best I can describe it is trying to be conscious of a certain consistency, or harmony.  I’m not going too far as I’m not here to talk about parenting skills and technique.  I’m just pointing out the observation I’ve had over time, for what it’s worth, that our household seems to function better when we have our act together, which certainly varies from time to time! I will admit that our good times, not so good times, laughs, disagreements…could sometimes be contagious and set the tone for the whole household, whether we realized it or not.

This general vibe at home can probably also explain some of the interaction with the kids…I’m just looking back thinking about the car rides home from work out, the dinner conversations, the TV breaks…as frustratingly uncommunicative (or sometimes confrontational) as they could be (think tired, cranky teenager)…were probably just important breaks and down times during exhaustingly busy schedules that we may have gotten in the way of every once in a while, causing (perhaps unnecessary), dis-harmony. I remind myself, that obviously we’re the parents and of course we should act accordingly, but maybe there’s an element of perspective and/or battle picking that can be applied to promote that consistency and harmony to the day to day.

I’ve read, and I’m aware that kids are influenced by their environment. Maybe we were imagining it, but if things were “good” at home, it seemed the kids were in a better place at school, and even the pool. Insert your own various and relative definitions for “good” and hopefully you get my general, non-judgmental point. In any event, suffice to say that I’ll add for all of us, “it ain’t always easy”, to my recurring cry, “parents are awesome”!
 

Michael Conaton, Badger Swim Club Inc. and Badger Swimming Inc. accept no liability for the content of this article, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.

Badger Swimmer Anina Lund Makes Verbal Commitment To California Golden Bears

Photo Courtesy: Griffin Scott

As Reported by Swimming World Magazine:

The California Golden Bears claimed a verbal commitment from distance freestyler Anina Lund in a bid to help regain its freestyle strength.

Lund will be a big asset to a program that had not been very strong in distance freestyle recently. She’ll partly fill a gap left by the departure of Cierra Runge from the program and will score well in the 500 and 1650 freestyles at the Pac 12 championships in her freshman year.

Lund, who currently represents Badger Swim Club in New York state, holds best times of 4:49.40 in the 500 free and 16:27.90 in the 1650 free that were done at the 2013 U.S. winter nationals. READ MORE…

CONGRATULATIONS ANINA!